Nebraska Society

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The Nebraska Society of the SAR was organized April 26, 1890 in the Paxton Hotel of Omaha. Thirty candidates were present. When it became apparent that not all could correctly claim descent from Revolutionary forebears, at a fall meeting a resolution was adopted notifying all applicants to complete and to document their credentials carefully. As a result 18 names were dropped. Most of the members of the Nebraska Society are located in the eastern area of the state.

There are two chapters, one in Lincoln and the other in Omaha. We are working to form a third chapter in the central part of the state.  Membership had declined in past years; however we are seeing new interest among younger members. Since 2008 our membership is up by about 30 members! Among the well-known compatriots in our membership were Roscoe Pound, Dean of the Harvard Law School; Samuel Avery, Past Chancellor of the University of Nebraska; Harold J. Daub Jr., Congressmen, Mayor, Presidential appointee as Chairmen of the Social Security Advisory Board and Sterling Faan Mutz, who became President General of the National Society.

In recent years our National Trustees have been James Say, and Fred Walden . The latter also served as the Vice President General of the North Central District. On March 27, 1961, the late Compatriot Elmer Forrest Estes, then the President of the State Society, wrote to members as follows: “Members join the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution because they have pride in family, because they want to record in some safe place the genealogical line which proves them to be of Revolutionary or pre-Revolutionary ancestry (this amounts, in addition to pride of family, to pride of country). Members seldom join the SAR because of any particular political belief, and, in the strictest sense, we are pledged to be a non-partisan organization. We are proud of the men who are leaders in their church, in their civic clubs, in their political parties, in their community, and in their state and country.”

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